Sunday, February 28, 2010

RUMINATIONS ABOUT A PROPOSED "HANDKE READER" + FIRST RESPONSES

With a mediocre publisher in FS + G, a by and large even more idiotic reception there occurs to me yet one further idea [the moment I run out of ideas is the moment I die] and that is for a "HANDKE READER"....
It wasn't until Malcom Cowley put out his Faulkner Reader at about the time that Faulkner won the Nobel Prize that people started to read Faulkner - and Handke, who will win the Nobel, for writing, not for his anything but sterling character, can be regarded as the writer of the Yoknapatawpha County of his own SELF. There is something to be said for having an elephantine memory, about the only good thing to be said for aging. Doing analysis [self now] certainly freshens it, but not like me billy goat!

So give me your ideas, and then we'll whittle it down to a final, excerpts would be fine,
not just individual complete works, i.e. I think the Alaska chapter of A Slow Homecoming [Langsame Heimkehr] belongs.

  
 =========================================================
ROUND UP + COMMENT ON THE FIRST REsPONSES:

Thanks Edmond, the first one of two other endorsers to "commit" - no, SORROW is essential
after all,  you want a volume that is tailored for teachers, students, for the general reader,
and for
writers. That's what so great about "readers' - they are up to 750 or more pages long...

I would add to "excerpt from
weight of the world" - excerpts from the further three increasingly
large diary volumes... [with a separate long headnote, explaining the rake's progress along that line of work]

The New Yorker ran a finely made excerpt from
The Repetition at the time..

Jim Krusoe wishes for inclusion of  poems from
Innerworld and Nonsense... and has my
agreement,
Life Without Poetry from the latter, and someone could translate his "Gedicht
an die Dauer", thus making that long poem available uniquely only there! [Poem to Duration]

Some of the gems from "For Thucydides"!!!

I would have a major section with excerpts focusing on "sheer" writing from the big novels
including
Morawian
...

On the
Jukebox belongs as an example of that kind of "assaying" as I call those Versuche ...
Difficult to excerpt from the later plays except from Villages, and so I would put in something
light and delightful like
La Cuisine, the first of his two plays that he originally wrote in French.

So much for my own thinking so far.

Michael R.

MICHAEL ROLOFF
http://www.facebook.com/mike.roloff1?ref=name

Member Seattle Psychoanalytic Institute and Society

This LYNX will LEAP you to my HANDKE project sites and BLOGS
http://www.handke.scriptmania.com/favorite_links_1.html 

http://www.roloff.freehosting.net/index.html


"Degustibus disputandum est." Theodor Wiesenthal Adorno
"May the foggy dew bediamondize your hoosprings + the fireplug
of filiality reinsure your bunghole! {James  Joyce}
"Sryde Lyde Myde Vorworde Vorhorde Vorborde." [von Alvensleben]
"Siena me fe, disfescimi Maremma." [Dante]
"Ennui [Lange Weile] is the dreambird that hatches the egg of
experience." Walter Benjamin, the essay on Leskov.


http://analytic-comments.blogspot.com/ 
http://summapolitico.blogspot.com/
http://artscritic.blogspot.com/
 

A LETTER TO THE HEADS OF HOLZBRINCK PUBLISHER, WHO VIA F.S. _+ G ARE HANDKE'S PUBLISHERS IN THE U.S. ONLY THE PART THAT PERTAINS TO HANDKE





This is a Kopie of a letter communicated directly via the respective publishers on-line contacts to Holzbrink and John Sargent at McMillan




Sehr geehrte Frau Schöller, und Dr. von Holzbrinck:
,,
Ich trete an Sie heran in zwei Angelegenheiten, die erste [1] betrifft meine ehemalige Anstellung bei Farrar, Straus & Giroux; die zweite [2] das Verlegen dort von dem von mir da eingeführten und übersetzen Suhrkamp Autor Peter Handke – ja, dadurch dass Farrar Straus einen Haufen dort von  diesem Kuckuck da eingelegte Suhrkamp Autoren macht, sowie andere schöne und wichtigen deutschsprachigen Sachen, ist Holzbrinck ja der Amerikanische Verleger von Peter Handke, des gros von Hesse, Nelly Sachs, Hans Erich Nossack   deswegen Kopien dieses Brief an Suhrkamp, Residenz, Jung und Jung, und an McMillan USA, ihr Schirm in New York....

Hier folgt jetzt ein Brief den ich an New Directions gerichtet habe da dieser schöne Verlag schon einmal Erfolg mit einem Handke Titel hatte. Ansonsten habe ich auch Handke Gedichte bei Continnum und Urizen Books verlegt, Ueber die Dörfer hat hier Ariadne gemacht, und Yale University Press die zwei grossen Stücke Als wir noch nichts voneinander wussten &Die Kunst des Fragens.
Ein Grund für diesen Brief ist auch dass FSG es ploetzlich nicht mehr in der Lage sind mir Handke Bücher zu schicken, zum rezensieren, ich habe die Leute da, auch Herrn Galassi mehrmahls dazu gebeten, koenne ja auch meinen Account zur Abrechnung gebrauchen.
Ich bitte um Entschuldigung für mein inzwischen eher holpriges Deutsch. 


I wanted to call your attention especially to a recent marvelous title that Farrar, Straus declined, Kali [note of mine attached which can also be found at the page devoted to this novel at 
http://www.handkeprose2.scriptmania.com/

FSG it appears  consulted Handke's current chief translator Krishna Winstonwho said it was like some other Handke that had already been done, and also that she did not want to be completely overwhelmed. While I entirely understand the second of her reservations, I also entirely disagree with the first,  as is spelled out in detail in my "Note". Handke prides himself on not repeating himself, and can be said, with all the other contradictions he has committed, not  to have done
so in this instance, so far.

 Moreover, there are other important Handke titles on which Farrar, Straus has passed, most importantly the second volume of his spontaneous diary notations, Die Geschichte des Bleistifts [The History of the Pencil, L'Histoire de Crayon and also in Spanish and Portuguese,  etc.,  published by Residenz Verlag, Salzburg in 1981] which details not only Handke's then troubled state of mind, as in the first diary volume Weight of the World, but, more importantly, details his thinking on how his art is changing, focusing on what would become "the change" to what is called his "homecoming" period,
and on Walk About the Villages. This, aside Villages, happens to be my 
favorite - that is valuable to me - Handke title! There are two further diary volumes Am Felsfenster Morgens and Gestern Unterwegs [Mornings, at the Boulder Window + Yesterday, On My Way] that were published by  former Residenz editor Jochen Jung at his own firm Jung & Jung, also Salzburg at about 1989 and 2005 respectively. As an American publisher I would combine the two into one volume, and edit them with the English speaking public in mind. 

Scott Abbot has just completed a wonderful translation of Handke's great 1999 play Voyage by Dugout: The Play about the Film About the War and some marvelousplays remain untranslated: La Cuisine   [and unusually delightful text that he did for the Serbian director Materic] ; Zurüstungen für die Unsterblichkeit [Preparationsfor Immortality 1996] and the most recently produced playAls der Tag uns scheidet, a pendant to Beckett's Krapps Last Tape that has received wide notice and, being a two character play, is beloved by cash-strapped theaters for that reasons alone! And another, about guerrillas! partisans! -Storm Still - is about to premiere in Vienna.

Scott Abbot wants to do a combined edition of all of Handke's Yugoslavia texts
aside the one that was published by Viking, Journey to the Rivers: Justice for Serbia that is, to combine that with the first Abschied vom Traum vom 9ten Land, Sommerlicher Nachtrag,and Unter Tränen Fragend as well as Daimiel & Rund um das Tribunal as well as the most recent of those texts, one which deserves to be published as a stand alone it is so extraordinary [see the prose site for a discussion of it, also the Handke blogs] Die Kuckucke von Velica Hoca [The Cuckoos of Velica Hoca] where Handke, the old cusser of journalists, shows how to do it right.

Farrar Straus started to mispublish Handke about the time that they
combined the novel A Slow Homecoming with the diary of walking The Lesson of Saint Victoire and the memoir of Handke raising his daughter Amina, A Child's Storyinstead of doing these very different books separately. This made for an entirelyconfused reception, which persists, vide Benjamin Kunkel's introduction to therecent NYRB Books reprint of A SLOW HOMECOMING where he speculates in true postmenstrualist fashion on how these texts [which were never meant to be published together or regarded in that dried Tampax fashion] how that space between them exist in sprung rhyme, I am kidding]

That FSG passed on three of Handke's greatest texts Walk about the Villages and The Art of Asking  and The Hour We Knew Nothing of Each Other done respectively by Ariadne Books and Yale University Press, doing so despite the fact that Kaspar and Other Plays had gonethrough more than ten editions by then, that the second play collection, They Are Dying Out
and Other Plays 
had sold out, and actually ought to have been reprinted.
 
Fault for this mis-publication lies chiefly with the now deceased Runyonesque Culture-Vulture Roger Straus. Scott recently called my attention to a letter that Straus, in the early 90s,, sent to Siegfried Unseld and which Unseld gave to Handke who showed it to Scott -a daisy chain  now coming full circle - which says that he's got a major problem: Handke .... and it appears in usual fashion that Rogah failed to reflect that Handke sales or the lack thereof - which is what the problem was then about, prior to Rogah! Dissociating himself from Handke's undertakings in matters Yugoslavian – were certainly  in good part of his very own making since FSG had sold semimasspaperback editions of prior work several times over, and the first book of plays had had 10 + editions. Rogah and his succession of Handke editors who get Handke piled on their desk on joining the firm, imagine being settled with the re-incarnation of Goethe as you a very junior thingstart to work at such an august firm... well Handke must have had at least ten of them by now at Farrar. A couple of the earlier ones, one of whom also was mine, and Nancy Meiselas,  were fine, and so was the recently departed Annie Wedekind... but how can
one even keep up and how can they poor things with having this towering
work bestowed on them, a tower that keeps on growing. Elizabeth Sifton
fresh out of Radcliffe got Saul Bellow and swam, did not sink, and I can
see why Saul would have been happy too... after possible initial apprehensions....
read Ms. Sifton's delightful account of the experience at:
http://www.slate.com/
However, two editors who were not really Handke's editors, Michael DiCapua,
who if he had had his druthers initially would have blackballed Handke
as he did so many other of my projects, as well as Steve Wasserman who
when he ran Noonday Books, the forever stepchild paperback line, and
Hill + Wang, the designated  play-publishing wing, appear not to have
known either what do to do with these plays or the prose. Thus it continues to be amateur time, and I am Jonah ambergris that survivedthat experience who realized early on translating the early plays and directingthem and participating in their production that the kid from Griffen was a genius,and it would have taken a genius to guess how he developed, a matter that Siegfried
Unseld, too, then had his hunches.


I myself have no interest in translating any of these, as a matter, since I have
to complete some of my own scribblings, the only author for whom I would
interrupt these is last year's Büchner Prize winner, Josef Winkler,
one of whose books I did for Ariadne. His work gives me a great charge.
 However, there is a bunch of what look like fine translators from the German, a whole new generation  has sprung up in the meanwhile. Perhaps even Mr. Joel Agee who commented unfavorably on Krishna Winston's translation of Handke's recently published Don Juan might want to try his hand at one of these. He did a fine enoughjob with a Nossack whom I introduced at Farrar, Straus these many years ago.

If anyone wants to republish my translations of INNERWORLD and of NONSENSE AND HAPPINESS and add the wonderful long poem GEDICHT AN DIE DAUER, as Bartelsby in Spain did just now in Spain with their complete Handke poems.... I can’t imagine the world not welcoming it, the original editions are extremely valuable now.

I will send this on also to a few other American publishers that have sprung
up to do translations once I have their e-mails.

The first Robins are back in Seattle but no early morning mating calls yet
to ease me out of my dreams into the day.



 
MICHAEL ROLOFF
4616= 25th Ave NE # 357
Seattle, WA 98105
206-612-34576

http://www.facebook.com/mike.roloff1?ref=name

Member Seattle Psychoanalytic Institute and Society

This LYNX will LEAP you to my HANDKE project sites and BLOGS
http://www.handke.scriptmania.com/favorite_links_1.html 

http://www.roloff.freehosting.net/index.html


"May the foggy dew bediamondize your hoosprings + the fireplug
of filiality reinsure your bunghole! {James  Joyce}
"Sryde Lyde Myde Vorworde Vorhorde Vorborde." [von Alvensleben]
"Siena me fe, disfescimi Maremma." [Dante]
"Ennui [Lange Weile] is the dreambird that hatches the egg of
experience." Walter Benjamin, the essay on Leskov.


http://analytic-comments.blogspot.com/ 
http://summapolitico.blogspot.com/
http://artscritic.blogspot.com/
 
 

Saturday, February 20, 2010

HANDKE THE FRIEND OF PRINCES, PRESIDENTS, OF MILOSEVIC AND KARADIC AND BURDA THE MEDIA KING


                         Schon wieder ist er mit einer Obrigkeit!
 
        HANDKE THE FRIEND OF PRINCES, PRESIDENTS, OF MILOSEVIC
AND KARADIC AND BURDA THE MEDIA KING






Bundespräsident empfängt Peter Handke =


   Wien (OTS) - Bundespräsident Dr. Heinz Fischer hat heute den
österreichischen Schriftsteller Peter Handke, der sich gegenwärtig in
Wien befindet, zu einem Gedankenaustausch empfangen. Das Gespräch
fand in der Präsidentschaftskanzlei statt. Unter anderem sprachen
die Herren ueber folgendes:

Fischer [lachend]: Ja, und verdreschen Sie noch ihre Weiber, Herr Handke?

Handke: [lachend]: Nein, dazu bin ich jetzt zu alt.

Fischer:[lachend]: Schade. Die gehören doch einmal am Tag, und einmal am Tag in den Arsch.

Gemeinsames schallendes Gelächter.

Fischer: Also, was wünschen Sie sich von mir?

Handke: Dass Sie sich für den Karadic einsetzen, in Scheveningen.

Fischer: Ich dachte das wäre Ihr Ressort?

Handke: Meine Wenigkeit kann in diesem Fall nichts nutzen... Dabei funktioniere ich nur als eminence Grise
       ....
Fischer: Sie habe die Macht des Faktischen im Sinn?

Handke: Genau nach meinem Sinn gesprochen, wie ich schon immer sage: Das faktische sieg, wie bei Stalingrad,
        der Sieg der Fakten....

Fischer: In dieser Hinsicht hat sich einiges bei Ihren Ansichten verändert seitdem wir zum letzten Mal
        gesprochen...

Weiteres durch 
Rückfragehinweis:
   Österreichische Präsidentschaftskanzlei, Presse- und Informationsdienst
   Tel.: (++43-1) 53422 230
   

A LETTER TO VARIOUS AMERICAN PUBLISHER TO TAKE UP THE SLACK

WHERE FARRAR, STRAUS LEFT OFF

I wanted to call your attention especially to a recent marvelous title that Farrar,
Straus declined, Kali [note of mine attached which can also be found at the
page devoted to this novel at 

http://www.handkeprose2.scriptmania.com/

FSG it appears  consulted Handke's current chief translator Krishna Winston
who said it was like some other Handke that had already been done, and also
that she did not want to be completely overwhelmed. While I entirely understand
the second of her reservations, I also entirely disagree with the first,  as is spelled out in detail in my "Note". Handke prides himself on not repeating himself,
and can be said, with all the other contradictions he has committed, not  to have doneso in this instance, so far.

 Moreover, there are other important Handke titles on which Farrar, Straus
has passed, most importantly the second volume of his spontaneous diary 
notations, Die Geschichte des Bleistifts [The History of the Pencil, L'Histoire de Crayon and also in Spanish and Portuguese,  etc.,  published by Residenz Verlag, Salzburg in 1981] which details not only Handke's then troubled state of mind, as in the first diary volume Weight of the World, but, more importantly, details his thinking on how his art is changing, focusing on what would become "the change" to what is called his "homecoming" period, and on Walk About the Villages. This, aside Villages, happens to be my  favorite - that is valuable to me - Handke title!
There are two further diary volumes Am Felsfenster Morgens and Gestern Unterwegs [Mornings, at the Boulder Window + Yesterday, On My Way] that were published by 
 former Residenz editor Jochen Jung at his own firm Jung & Jung, also Salzburg at about 1989 and 2005 respectively. As an American publisher I would combine the two into one volumeand edit them with the English speaking public in mind. 

Scott Abbot has just completed a wonderful translation of Handke's great 1999 play
Voyage by Dugout: The Play about the Film About the War and some marvelous
plays remain untranslated: La Cuisine   [and unusually delightful text that he
did for the Serbian director Materic] ; Zurüstungen für die Unsterblichkeit [Preparations for Immortality 1996] and the most recently produced play
Als der Tag uns scheidet, a pendant to Beckett's Krapps Last Tape that has received wide noticeand, being a two character play, is beloved by cash-strapped theaters for that reasons alone!

And another, about guerrillas! partisans! -Storm Still - is about to premiere in Vienna.

Scott Abbot wants to do a combined edition of all of Handke's Yugoslavia texts
aside the one that was published by Viking, Journey to the Rivers: Justice for Serbia that is, to combine that with the first Abschied vom Traum vom 9ten Land, Sommerlicher Nachtrag, and Unter Tränen Fragend as well as Daimiel & Rund um das Tribunal as well as the most recent of those texts, one which deserves to be published as a stand alone it is so extraordinary [see the prose site for a discussion of it, also the Handke blogs] Die Kuckucke von Velica Hoca [The Cuckoos of Velica Hoca] where Handke, the old cusser of journalists, shows how to do it right.

Farrar Straus started to mispublish Handke about the time that they
combined the novel A Slow Homecoming with the diary of walking The Lesson of
Saint Victoire and the memoir of Handke raising his daughter Amina, A Child's Story
instead of doing these very different books separately. This made for an entirely
confused reception, which persists, vide Benjamin Kunkel's introduction to the
recent NYRB Books reprint of A SLOW HOMECOMING where he speculates 
in true postmenstrualist fashion on how these texts [which were never meant
to be published together or regarded in that dried Tampax fashion] how that
space between them exist in sprung rhyme, I am kidding]

That FSG passed on three of Handke's greatest texts Walk about the Villages and The Art of Asking  and The Hour We Knew Nothing of Each Other done respectively by Ariadne Books and Yale University Press, doing so despite the fact that Kaspar and Other Plays had gone through more than ten editions by then, that the second play collection, tThey Are Dying Out and Other Plays had sold out, and actually ought to have been reprinted.
 
Fault for this mis-publication lies chiefly with the now deceased Runyonesque Culture-Vulture Roger Straus. Scott recently called my attention to a letter that Straus, in the early 90s,, sent to Siegfried Unseld and which Unseld gave to Handke who showed it to Scott....a daisy chain  now coming full circle - which says that he's got a major problem:Handke .... and it appears in usual fashion that Rogah failed to reflect that Handke sales - which is what the problem was then about, prior to Rogah! dissociating himself from Handke's undertakings in matters Yugoslavian - of his very own making since FSG had sold semimasspaperback editions of prior work several times over, and the first book of plays had had 10 + editions. Rogah and his succession of editors who get Handke piled on their desk on joining the firm, imagine being settled with the re-incarnation of Goethe as you a very junior thing start to work at such an august firm... well Handke must have had at least ten of them by now. A couple of the earlier ones, one of whom also was mine, and Nancy Meiselas were fine, and so was the recently departed Annie Wedekind... but how can one even keep up with the whelming and how can they poor things with having this towering work bestowed on them, a tower that keeps on growing. Elizabeth Sifton fresh out of Radcliffe got Saul Bellow and swam, did not sink, and I can
see why Saul would have been happy too... after possible initial apprehensions....
read Ms. Sifton's delightful account of the experience at:
http://www.slate.com/
However, two editors who were not really Handke's editors, Michael DiCapua,
who if he had had his druthers initially would have blackballed Handke
as he did so many other of my projects, as well as Steve Wasserman who
when he ran Noonday Books, the forever stepchild paperback line, and
Hill + Wang, the designated  play-publishing wing, appears not to have
known either what do to do with these plays or the prose.

 Thus it continues to be amateur time, and I am Jonah ambergris that survived
that experience who realized early on translating the early plays and directing
them and participating in their production that the kid from Griffen was a genuis,
and it would have taken a genius to guess how he developed, a matter that Siegfried
Unseld, too, then had his hunches.

I myself have no interest in translating any of these,  as a matter, since I have
to complete some of my own scribblings, the only author for whom I would
interrupt these is last year's Büchner Prize winner, Josef Winkler, one of whose books I did for Ariadne. His work gives me a great charge.
However,  there is a bunch of what look like fine translators from the German, a whole new generation  has sprung up in the meanwhile. Perhaps even Mr. Joel Agee who commented unfavorably on Krishna Winston's translation of Handke's recently published Don Juan might want to try his hand at one of these. He did a fine enough
job with a Nossack whom I introduced at Farrar, Straus these many years ago.

If anyone wants to republish my translations of INNERWORLD and of NONSENSE AND HAPPINESS and add the wonderful long poem GEDICHT AN DIE DAUER, as Bartelsby
in Spain did just now in Spain with their complete Handke poems....

I will send this on also to a few other American publishers that have sprung
up to do translations once I have their e-mails.

The first Robins are back in Seattle but no early morning mating calls yet
to ease me out of my dreams into the  day.

Michael Roloff

Thursday, February 18, 2010

A SECOND LETTER TO THE NY TIMES BOOK REVIEW RE AGEE AND MENTION OF TRANSLATIONS



http://www.nytimes.com/2010/02/14/books/review/Agee-t.html?nl=books&emc=booksupdateema3
Perhaps the NY Times Book Review could make it a practice of asking reviewers of translations
if they comment on the translation, whether favorably or not or interestingly, to cite chapter and verse and make reasoned comments. * That way, among other matters, my better, Krishna Winston, won't have to ask me whether maybe there is is something to Agee's reservations or whether they are merely the gratuitous carpings of a fellow translator as  one encounters them with such frequency especially among the amateurs of that caste who do not reflect on the fact that most cats can be skinned at least in two and often nine ways. Since the publisher, however, to whom I brought and for I whom translated three volumes of Handke, including a dozen plays had failed to heed my several requests to send me a copy of the book and if need be charge my account, I was unable to reassure Krishna or express agreement with Mr. Agee's assessment except to tell her that in her translation of the 350 K words CROSSING THE SIERRA DEL GREDOS unfortunately I encountered two words that struck me as wrong and one awkward passage, lucky man that Handke is to have found her
to take up where Ralph Mannheim left off, some of whose work, especially when it came to matters of linguistic contemporaneity since he had lived abroad for so long, and the rhythms of Handke's prose, since after all Handke can be approached, ought to be as a prose poet, made me anything but happy.

As I mentioned in my first communication on the Agee review, which to be found on-line at
 
http://adswithoutproducts.com/2010/02/13/the-nyt-continues-its-campaign-against-low-testosterone-levels-in-male-writing/
and at:
http://handke-trivia.blogspot.com/
Mr. Agee's was in many ways the best review that Handke has received in your pages, not that that is unfortunately saying very much, although Joel's review can let itself be seen even without making such a baleful comparison,  to, say that criminal act of non-reading that your Neil Gordon perpetrated in your pages on the occasion of CROSSING THE SIERRA DEL GREDOS or the piece of idiocy done there by Lee Siegel - Agee pretty well got what Handke was up to, except for that non-pertinent last paragraph. I was not left too unhappy that he does not know nor did mention into what line of Handke's Don  Juan assaying fits; or that he failed to appreciate the pure virtuoso nature of the danse that Handke performs, two steps forward and one back, as Handke also explores PLACE [the last dramas ] a place near his No-Man's-Bay, the foret de Chaville, as is his custom; that is, the nature of Handke's formalism, the sheer performance of that... at that point, after all, we are getting into deeper waters than one needs to as a reviewer. Or that there
is a "Don Juan" who "appears with the same woman" in Handke's
My Year in the No-Man's-Bay, which is a nice enough joke that happens to refer to the in many ways enviable genuine reincarnation Erich Wolfgang Skwara  who has had four, several of them extraordinary, novels published in translation, especially his Don Juan novel, The Plague of Siena, of none of which the Book Review has taken any note,
perhaps because they were done by that small publisher of no end of Austrian treasures, Ariadne Press, who also happen to be the publisher of Handke's greatest and richest work
Walk About the Villages, which
also seems to have passed you by and many another East Coast Publication and reviewer. Or...

Sincerely yours,
Michael Roloff  [as "Der Getreue Korreptitor"]
http://www.facebook.com/mike.roloff1?ref=name
Member Seattle Psychoanalytic Institute and Society
http://www.roloff.freehosting.net/index.html

This LYNX will LEAP you to my HANDKE project sites and BLOGS
http://www.handke.scriptmania.com/favorite_links_1.html

"Degustibus disputandum est" {Theodor Wiesenthal Adorno}
"May the foggy dew bediamondize your hoosprings + the fireplug
of filiality reinsure your bunghole! {James  Joyce}
"Sryde Lyde Myde Vorworde Vorhorde Vorborde." {von Alvensleben}
"Siena me fe, disfescimi Maremma." {Dante}
"Ennui [Lange Weile] is the dreambird that hatches the egg of
experience." {Walter Benjamin, the essay on Leskov.}

http://analytic-comments.blogspot.com/
http://summapolitico.blogspot.com/


*I will always recall a moment when both Helen Wolf, a most distinguished old time publisher,
and I a comparative novice, both members of the PEN AMERICAN CENTER's Translation Committee
cast the most baleful of looks at each other, with amazing simultaneity,  as that committee proceeded well into a second meeting to wrangle over the placement of a single comma in its mission statement, as though their lives depended on it, as it does in only one instance I have encountered during my nine lives,
in a passage in Robert Musil's great novella THE PORTUGUESE WOMAN.

Monday, February 15, 2010

A Lettter to Johnathan Gallassi re Handke's DON JUAN

Dear Mr. Gallassi

Below is a letter of mine to the NYTimes Book Review about Agee's piece + a comment I left at the blog "ads without products" 
that is discussing that title.

Meanwile I had a letter from Krishna asking me how I felt about Agee's comment about the translation  and replied that I never make such comments without chapter and verse and that I found two troubling
words and one troubling formulation in her DEL GREDOS.

I wrote FSG and then you requesting a review copy for which you could also charge my account, I made millions for FSG and get biannual royalties.
It has not reached me and I am about to write to your owner in Germany, and Roger Straus who was a cherry picking crook managed to screw me out of half my royalties, but all those people are gone and dead, and so there are no hard feelings to anyone there except perhaps to that little girl who kept Annie Wedekind's e-mail address but never replies as Annie did so perfectly. As a once abandoned child, the irritation that non-response elicits is one sequaelae I expect i will never get over. Especially since I had a grandmother who said "manners is something you are born with." Photo attached. [The year is 1935, that is my Grandfather Werner von Alvensleben in back who already survived the 'night of the long knives, a death sentence and the first of four concentration camps, my father and my mother who both survived their gestapo prisons, and my grandmother, Alexandra von Einsiedel, who came to our place outside Bremen in the last years of the third Reich and was starving herself to die in sympathy with her there pictures closest relatives. You notice me as that dream flitting back and forth between the two rows, look closely, like a humming bird!]

 So if you could send Don Juan and also the Fred Seidel, old friend large chunks of whose Final Solutions I published in another life time at Metamorphosis, and which I asked for half a year ago.


1] THE LETTER



 
When Joel Agee writes "For all its engaging and delicate ruminations, and despite its bold, humorous claim to be “the definitive and true story of Don Juan,” the book left me wanting to hear again Mozart’s treatment of the same theme. That music has everything Handke’s prose lacks: brio, verve, declarative intensity, a vast range of emotion and, last but not least, brilliant, joyful virility."

 Agee suffers from adjectivitis, a much more serious ailment than conjunctities because it will not respond to anti-biotics. The comparisons he makes are just as inapt and inept. I happen to delight in the formal dance Handke performs there, it is as good if not better and lighter than what he does in his THREE ESSAYS [on Tiredness, the Juke Box, and The Day that Went Well. And if you read what I write about Handke - even though his backer and once translator - I have no compunctions about criticizing him when I feel he can be criticized within his own terms, and do a better of of it than any  German or American reviewer. 

I myself have not written about Don Juan so far,
 I have a page devoted to Handke's DON JUAN @:

 s!

2] thought it was the best review Handke has ever gotten in the NY Times, which i realize is not saying much considering that it has treated him to some of the stupidest and most insulting reviews this side of archangelsk. i have a roundup of the handke reception at my
and since i decided about twenty years ago to focus exclusively on a developting target – handke and his work – from every imaginable side, there have been unanticipated findings: i.e just looking at the handke reception both for his plays and his prose you notice how entirely incapable is of dealing with “the new” , which allegedly the culture and the whole business community is always championing. how these reviewers are incapable of even descring their own reaction.
it is a thorougly depressing. and so it never comes to intelligent criticism or consideration of his work, ditto for no end of others of course.

“As I was saying.” [which is how 'Ride Across Lake Constance begins] I liked the review quite a bit
except for that moronic ending, which manifested to me that Agee who is no slouch as a memoirist or translator hadn’t really understood, taken delight, or contemplated what ought really to happen to the reader after that danse. close but not as good as william gass might have been.



--
MICHAEL ROLOFF
http://www.facebook.com/mike.roloff1?ref=name

Member Seattle Psychoanalytic Institute and Society

This LYNX will LEAP you to my HANDKE project sites and BLOGS
http://www.handke.scriptmania.com/favorite_links_1.html
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"May the foggy dew bediamondize your hoosprings + the fireplug
of filiality reinsure your bunghole! {James  Joyce}
"Sryde Lyde Myde Vorworde Vorhorde Vorborde." [von Alvensleben]
"Siena me fe, disfescimi Maremma." [Dante]
"Ennui [Lange Weile] is the dreambird that hatches the egg of
experience." Walter Benjamin, the essay on Leskov.
http://analytic-comments.blogspot.com/ http://summapolitico.blogspot.com/

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MICHAEL ROLOFF http://www.facebook.com/mike.roloff1?ref=name Member Seattle Psychoanalytic Institute and Society this LYNX will LEAP you to all my HANDKE project sites and BLOGS: http://www.roloff.freehosting.net/index.html "MAY THE FOGGY DEW BEDIAMONDIZE YOUR HOOSPRINGS!" {J. Joyce} "Sryde Lyde Myde Vorworde Vorhorde Vorborde" [von Alvensleben] contact via my website http://www.roloff.freehosting.net/index.html